Tag Archives: art

Attend Two Wine Festivals June 5th- 6th

13 May

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Come stay with us and enjoy two wine festivals on the same weekend.
 
The Georgia Fine Wine Festival at Blackstock Winery
 Food, wine, music and art in the North Georgia mountains Saturday, June 5th. 11am – 5pm, Sunday, June 6th. 1pm – 5pm
$35 – one day ticket, $50 – two-day ticket, $15 – non-wine adult ticket
With your ticket purchase, you will receive a souvenir “passport” wine glass which will allow you to have free wine tasting’s throughout the festival grounds. The festival features nearly 50 Georgia-grown wines, over 15 dishes, great jazz headliners.
Call 706-219-2789 for more information.

Georgia Wine Country Festival at Three Sisters Winery
A Celebration of Wine, Music and Art  June 5-6, 11am-6pm. Attendees can sample fine wines from members of the Georgia Wine Council and guest wineries with wines to be poured by Boutier Winery, Chateau Elan, Crimson ‘n Scarlet, Georgia Wines,  Serenity Cellars, Yonah Mountain Vineyards, Three Sisters, Chestatee and the Walasiyi Wine Company and more. Call 706-865-9463 or see comment below  for more information.

24th Annual Mountain Flower Fine Art & Wine Festival 5/15-16

27 Apr

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Come out and enjoy over 70 artists of all varieties and even watch some of them as they create their art on the spot. From pottery to two-dimensional art to photography, there will be something for everyone.

Along with all the fine art, there will be the Garden Expo located in Hancock Park.  This is produced by the Master Gardeners of Lumpkin County along with the support of MFAF. The Expo will include large plant and seed sales, as well as speakers hosting programs on a variety of garden related topics.  A demonstration garden featuring native plants and wildflowers will be on display.

New for this year, will be the Georgia Temptations Wine Garden, a sampling of the best wines in Georgia. The Garden will be located in the Park Place Pavilion. You must be 21 or older to enter. This is a wonderful way to sample a variety of our Georgia grown and produced wines. There will be a minimal entrance fee to enter the Garden. The Garden hours are Saturday: 10 A.M. to 6 P.M. and Sunday 12:30 P.M. to 5:00 P.M.

The Dahlonega Farmer’s Market kicks off its season this weekend in Hancock Park. Locally grown vegetables and fruits along with homemade jams and other items will be available for purchase. The Dahlonega Farmer’s Market will be open every Saturday and Tuesday mornings.

On Saturday, there will be a 5K race benefiting the Free Clinic of Dahlonega. For more information on the race and to pre-register, please visit www.active.com.

Parking is free and located around the square and just off the square. The parking garage at North Georgia College and State University is also available for $5 per day. The Dahlonega Merchants invite you to enjoy a weekend of fine dining, shopping, art and wine!

This year’s festival is produced by the Dahlonega Merchants Association and sponsored by the Dahlonega Arts Council. For more information, please visit: www.dahlonegamerchants.org.

Artists Marketplace in Dahlonega

11 May


Artist Marketplace moves to Hancock Park in Dahlonega

The Artist Marketplace features juried original handcrafted artwork from local area artists the first Saturday of each month starting on May 2 through October and is presented by the Dahlonega Arts Council and sponsored by the Downtown Development Authority.

The artist marketplace is in conjunction with the Dahlonega Farmers Market located in Hancock Park on the corner of N. Park St. and Warwick St. from 7am-3pm. Artists are from Lumpkin County or an adjacent county and be members of the Dahlonega Arts Council.

For more information visit Dahlonega Arts.

Bottle Trees at Cedar House Inn

24 Feb


Cedar House Inn has found a new way to recycle wine bottles. We have created bottle trees and shrubs. In the past we took our glass wine bottles to have them recycled. On television we noticed that a PBS show had a feature on making bottle trees.

Apparently bottle trees originated in Africa. People thought that evil spirits would fly up the neck of the bottle and become trapped.

We made ours out of fence posts you can purchase at the local lumber yard. We used long nails or gutter spikes to hang the bottles on the trunk.

The great thing about the trees is that the never need watering and are always colorful. The are very pretty in the sunlight and sometimes make a slight ringing sound on windy days.

What a great recycling idea that adds a little art and color to the yard.

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