Tag Archives: environment

Cedar House Inn Awarded TripAdvisors GreenLeader™ Status

3 May

Cedar House Inn has been awarded the Gold level GreenLeader into the new TripAdvisor® GreenLeaders™ program, which helps travelers plan greener trips by identifying environmentally-friendly accommodationsgreenleader_en-17354-2 across the U.S.

TripAdvisor GreenLeaders have met a set of environmental standards developed for TripAdvisor by a leading environmental consulting firm, with input from expert partners. The more green practices a hotel has in place, the higher its GreenLeader level, which is shown on the property’s listing on the TripAdvisor site.

Travelers can now search for accommodations that have a GreenLeaders status on the TripAdvisor site, and view a detailed list of environmentally-friendly practices that they can expect at each location.

“TripAdvisor GreenLeaders are leading the hospitality industry in making efforts to improve their environmental footprint,” said Jenny Rushmore, director of responsible travel at TripAdvisor. “We greatly applaud these accommodations and are pleased to share their eco-friendly practices with our online audience of more than 200 million travelers.”

The TripAdvisor GreenLeaders program was developed in partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ENERGY STAR® program, the U.S. Green Building Council, and the United Nations Environment Programme. For more information, please visit http://www.tripadvisor.com/GreenLeaders.

Annual Trail Fest 3/22-3/24

8 Jan

Come stay with us and attend the 3rd Annual Dahlonega Trail Fest 2013 March 22-24 called Spring on Springer.

The vernal equinox marks the first day of spring. In 2013, the equinox occurs on March 20, right in the middle of the NOrthBOund Thru Hiker kickoff season at Springer Mountain, the southern terminus of the Appalachian Trail. The third annual Spring on Springer Dahlonega TrailFest will celebrate Dahlonega’s designation as an AT Trail Community by the Appalachian Trail Conservancy and Dahlonega’s position as the southern gateway to the Appalachian Trail. It will be held on March 22-24 on the cusp of the first day of spring in Dahlonega, Georgia.

The Trail Fest will include camping, speakers, films, music, shuttles to Springer Mountain and Amicalola Falls, equipment vendors, and workshops on such topics as safety, camping techniques, and equipment.

Fun trail related activities such as a 5k trail run, canoeing/kayaking, guided hikes, and local tours.

2012 featured speakers/authors included: Warren Doyle, record holding 16 time thru hiker; Gene Espy, second person to ever thru hike the AT in 1951; Paralee Dawson, section hiker and author; Sandra Friend, author of over 15 hiking guidebooks; and Johnny Molloy, author of over 38 hiking guidebooks.

Films will include: Flip Flop Flippin, a film by Scott “Squatch” Herriott

The Trail Fest will be a fun filled weekend celebrating Dahlonega’s Trail Community designation, the importance of the Appalachian Trail to Dahlonega and Lumpkin County, the significance of Dahlonega to the many users of the AT, and all aspects of responsible use of the north Georgia forests for recreation.

For information and details, check the Trail Fest website at www.dahlonegatrailfest.org

Hemlockfest 11/4-6 Musical Line Up Announced

12 Aug

For the seventh annual HemlockFest, the Lumpkin Coalition has again assembled an array of the area’s most awesome talents. Headliners for this year’s event—which returns to Starbridge Sanctuary near Dahlonega this November 4th, 5th and 6th—include Colonel Bruce Hampton and the Pharaoh Gummitt, Saint Francis, and the Lefty Williams Band.

Sunday’s line-up will be highlighted by Steel String Session and their brand of cosmic blues rockabilly bluegrass.

Dahlonega’s own prized talents will abound this year, with Home Grown Revival, Emerald Rose, and the Pick & Bow Band returning as crowd favorites. Carly Gibson, a singer/songwriter prodigy from Lumpkin County who completed programs at the prestigious GRAMMY Camp in Los Angeles, will be a new local addition.

This year’s bill includes other first-time HemlockFest performers, including Caroline Aiken, often cited as one of the cornerstones of the Decatur folk movement; and The Reese Boyd Project, which is fronted by a 10-year-old prodigy guitarist. Insonnia, Mean Mary, BlueBilly Grit, and 710 South will also make their HemlockFest debuts. More returning HemlockFest performers include Veronika Jackson, Women of Heart, and Barry Bailey. Unifire Theatre will appear once again with their stunning fire arts show.

HemlockFest is an unparalleled musical experience in a peaceful and beautiful setting just outside of Dahlonega. This all-ages, eco-friendly event features three days of live music, primitive camping, educational exhibits, arts and crafts vendors, a kid’s nature village, rustic living demonstrations, great food, and free canoeing. Both day and weekend passes will be available, and admission is free for kids (ages 15 and under with a supervising adult ticket holder).

HemlockFest proceeds aid efforts to minimize the impact of the non-native hemlock woolly adelgid parasite, which is devastating the hemlock trees of North Georgia at an alarming rate. HemlockFest has affected the raising of more than $100,000 to support predator beetle rearing labs at area colleges and universities. This effort to introduce predator beetles, which feed on hemlock woolly adelgids and are a safe and effective biological control, may help to save our native forests and preserve our quality-of-life.

Visit the website at http://www.hemlockfest.org or call the Hemlock Hotline at (706) 867-5157 for more information about HemlockFest, the hemlock crisis, or to volunteer. The Lumpkin Coalition, sponsor of the festival, is a 100% volunteer non-profit 501(c)3 charitable organization formed to facilitate projects that benefit North Georgia, Lumpkin County, its residents and visitors. The Lumpkin Coalition is dedicated to preserving quality of life for all those who share it. To this end, it supports the preservation of a clean and healthy environment, responsible living, and responsible growth.

Paper & Plastic Bag Tax Is A Great Idea

3 Jun


On tonight’s ABC World News they featured a story about the use of paper and plastic shopping bags in grocery stores. The public has been slow to adopt the usage of reusable shopping bags. You have seen them. They are made of cloth or heavy plastic.

I have mentioned on previous blog posts that I am frustrated that when I go shopping with my wife she seems to be the only one using reusable bags. The other mindless shoppers are using the free throw away plastic or paper bags.

On tonight’s news they mentioned that some major cities are thinking about imposing a tax on each throw away plastic or paper bag used. San Francisco has already outlawed plastic bags. Other cities like Washington, DC are looking at a 20 cent per bag tax. The poor are crying foul saying they cannot afford the tax. At Trader Joe’s last week we bought a reusable bag for about a dollar. Reusable bags are affordable so the poor need to think of another reason.

In Ireland the ABC News story went on to say that they have imposed a 33 cent a bag tax on all bags. Nine out of ten consumers in Ireland now bring reusable bags when they go shopping. Hitting the pocketbook changes consumer behavior in Ireland. Would such a tax work in the USA. I would be willing to give it a try.

I hope Americans think about the consequences of their buying habits but I know that is wishful thinking on my part.

Bring on the bag tax and lets get rid of those awful plastic and paper bags that create pollution in their manufacturing (plastic) not to mention the number of trees that must be cut down for us to use a throw away paper bag.

Go out and purchase some reusable bags next time you shop and keep them in your car so that they can be used for your next grocery shopping trip.

Next time the check out person says paper or plastic say neither, I brought my own reusable bags.

Hemp – The Environmentally Sustainable Alternative (Part 1)

14 Apr

Hemp has over 25,000 product uses that help the environment including paper, plastics and food. Hemp paper saves the forests and hemp plastic does not require oil. The plant is easy to grow and requires no fertilizers, pesticides or herbicides. Why is it illegal in the USA? This is the industrial version. Not the kind you smoke. We use it in our composting toilets at the inn. It is crazy that our government bans this wonderful plant.

Where does your kleenex come from?

11 Apr

At Cedar House Inn we use recycled content tissue and paper products exclusively. Such products can be purchased at most grocery stores. We happen to like the Publix Greenwise paper products. They are not only recycled content but also affordable.

Kleenex which is made by the giant company Kimberly Clarke cuts down ancient old growth forests to make tissue for wiping noses and other things. This is not only environmentally destructive to the trees, wildlife and the Earth. It is also irresponsible.

It’s almost as crazy as using clean drinking water to water your grass. That’s another topic.

Please watch this video for more information.

Your Water Footprint

12 Mar

I was reading our Green Hotels newsletter yesterday and there was a short article on water footprints. We have all heard about carbon footprint but water footprint was new to me. Water is a resource that should be conserved. Some say water will be the next oil in terms of scarcity of fresh water supplies.

At Cedar House Inn we value water and try to conserve it as much as we can. Low flow shower heads and sink aerators have been installed in all bathrooms. Guest reminder stickers are in the bathroom asking guests not to waste water. We use low flush toilets throughout the property and have composting toilets that require no water. Guest bed and bath linens are not changed daily (unless requested) to save laundry water. An Energy Star washing machine and dishwasher have also been installed that use less water compared to conventional appliances.

In our owner’s area we have a bucket to catch the cold water coming out of the bathtub faucet prior to the warm shower water arriving. We use it to flush the toilet or water the plants. We also use the “if it’s yellow let it mellow, if it’s brown flush it down” philosophy in our bathroom. I save my “liquid gold” for reuse as nitrogen fertilizer (see earlier blog post on this topic). We turn off the sink when we brush our teeth is another water saving tip.

A few months ago we installed a new metal roof to capture rainwater more efficiently. We have not installed rain gutters and barrels yet. Our yard is a freedom lawn that requires no water. Native drought tolerant plants have been planted as well.

In terms of shopping the Green Hotels article mentioned the water footprint of products we purchase. For example 20 gallons of water to make a pint of beer, 132 gallons for 2 liters of soda, 500 gallons to make a pair of Levi’s stonewashed jeans. Even some foods have a higher water footprint depending on where they are grown and the type of plant.

I am not suggesting we give up beer or quit wearing bluejeans. I do think we all need to be more mindful of our water usage and footprint.

The Green Hotels newsletter referenced an article on this topic published in Currents, The Wall Street Journal, 2/17/2009 by Alexandra Alter.

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