Tag Archives: gardening

Dahlonega Thanksgiving in the North Georgia Mountains 2013

16 Nov

We have decided to accommodate guests for the evening of Thanksgiving Day 2013. Normally we have closed for Thanksgiving Day to spend time with our family. This year we have already booked other guests for Thanksgiving Day with check in after 6 pm.

If you want to enjoy Thanksgiving in the North Georgia mountains please consider staying with us.

Check our web site and availability calendar for what we have available.

Where to eat Thanksgiving Dinner in Dahlonega?

At this time we know of three options that are shown below. We will be adding additional places for Thanksgiving Dinner when they become available to us. Check out our Facebook page for future additions.

  • The Smith House offers Thanksgiving Dinner each year.  Call 706-867-7000 for more information.
  • Yahoola Creek Grill is also having Thanksgiving Dinner- More Information on Menu and pricing is shown below the Montaluce Winery Information.
  •  Montaluce Winery is offering Thanksgiving Dinner this year. Information is below:

front for fall

From Their Harvest to Your Table

Montaluce & Le Vigne Restaurant will be offering their Family Style Thanksgiving Lunch that will including fresh produce from their first harvest of the new Garden at Montaluce.

We were there a few weeks ago for a Sunday wine tasting and to enjoy live music at the winery and saw their mini hoop houses set up on their grounds with a large variety of vegetables happily growing and protected from the recent cold weather.

Time: 12pm-3pm
What to Expect:

  • First Course – Seasonal Soup
  • Second Course – Organic Garden Grown Salad
  • Third Course – Family Style Thanksgiving Favorites.
  • Fourth Course – Mixed Seasonal Pies and Desserts
(special exceptions may be made for any food allergies)

Price: $70 per person

To make your reservation, call 706.867.4060 or email info@montaluce.com

  • Yahoola Creek Grill Thanksgiving- 11/28- 11 am-5pm

Enjoy all of Chef Rick’s Holiday Favorites!
$28 per adult, $10 per child

(age 11 and under)
Served Family StyleMain Entrée

Traditional Roast Turkey with Gravy
Brown Sugar and Honey Glazed Ham

Vegetables

Creamed Corn
Buttered Carrots
Brussels Sprouts
Green Bean Casserole

Side Dish

Sage Dressing
Creamy Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes
Mushroom Risotto

Dessert (choose one)

Warmed Ellijay Apple Crisp with Vanilla Ice Cream
House-Made Pumpkin Pie with Fresh Whipped Cream

Spots are filling up fast… make your reservation today by calling Yahoola Creek Grill at  706-482-2200

Tomatoes: July to January

4 Jan

With smiles on our faces and tears in our eyes, we said good-bye to the last of our raw 2010 home-grown organic  tomatoes tonight. It adorned our salad adding a pop of red to our plates and a burst of flavor to our tongues.  How exciting to think that it grew from a plant we put in the ground in April and that it’s sisters and brothers were picked as early as July. We ate them green – both fried and in chocolate cake, red and raw in gaspacho, salsa, and salads, and cooked in pasta sauce, stewed tomatoes, chili, and more. They were gifted to friends and guests, and even traded for pasture raised eggs. Good-bye summer tomatoes!

24th Annual Mountain Flower Fine Art & Wine Festival 5/15-16

27 Apr

Like This!

Come out and enjoy over 70 artists of all varieties and even watch some of them as they create their art on the spot. From pottery to two-dimensional art to photography, there will be something for everyone.

Along with all the fine art, there will be the Garden Expo located in Hancock Park.  This is produced by the Master Gardeners of Lumpkin County along with the support of MFAF. The Expo will include large plant and seed sales, as well as speakers hosting programs on a variety of garden related topics.  A demonstration garden featuring native plants and wildflowers will be on display.

New for this year, will be the Georgia Temptations Wine Garden, a sampling of the best wines in Georgia. The Garden will be located in the Park Place Pavilion. You must be 21 or older to enter. This is a wonderful way to sample a variety of our Georgia grown and produced wines. There will be a minimal entrance fee to enter the Garden. The Garden hours are Saturday: 10 A.M. to 6 P.M. and Sunday 12:30 P.M. to 5:00 P.M.

The Dahlonega Farmer’s Market kicks off its season this weekend in Hancock Park. Locally grown vegetables and fruits along with homemade jams and other items will be available for purchase. The Dahlonega Farmer’s Market will be open every Saturday and Tuesday mornings.

On Saturday, there will be a 5K race benefiting the Free Clinic of Dahlonega. For more information on the race and to pre-register, please visit www.active.com.

Parking is free and located around the square and just off the square. The parking garage at North Georgia College and State University is also available for $5 per day. The Dahlonega Merchants invite you to enjoy a weekend of fine dining, shopping, art and wine!

This year’s festival is produced by the Dahlonega Merchants Association and sponsored by the Dahlonega Arts Council. For more information, please visit: www.dahlonegamerchants.org.

Building Permaculture Swales to Conserve Water

23 Apr

Like This!

We built a permaculture swale above the vegetable garden and blueberry bush area to capture the rain to prevent runoff and conserve the water for future use. Swales have been proven to retain water by forcing the rainwater into the Earth down to the impervious layer of soil. The water then travels under the surface and provides plant roots with needed irrigation. Such water can travel great distances and be stored for extended periods of time. Swales conserve valuable rainwater that normally runs down slopes and eventually ends up in driveways and storm sewers. They also help reduce evaporation of rainwater.

We built a swale above the garden to capture water running down the hill from the north end of the property. The swale is approximately one foot deep and 16 inches wide. Swale depth can vary depending on slope of hill and soil type. For example we made the swale shallower but wider in areas with rock closer to the surface which made digging more difficult. The swale at the top of the hill provides water for the peach trees, blueberry bushes and concord grapes. Decomposed leaves are placed in the swale to help retain water. Wheat straw covers the leaves and swale berm to prohibit erosion.

Another smaller swale was dug at the bottom of the hill using the same technique. This swale catches additional water for the vegetable garden. We are considering the addition of strawberries on the berm portion of this swale since they have deep roots and will help stabilize the berm. Not to mention fresh strawberries in the future.

Additional swales will be built on the property in the future.

To see a video of our swales visit video.

Geoff Lawton is a renowned permaculturist and did a great video on how swales work. Visit his video by clicking how swales work.

Video Update of Permaculture Vegetable Garden

30 Mar

Like This!

We filmed a short video today showing the progress made on the garden area using a permaculture sheet mulching technique. We also cleared the hill above the garden of the pine trees and planted peaches and blueberries that will provide breakfast ingredients in the future. The pine trees were used to make a living fence to keep out larger animals and to provide a habitat for birds. In the future we will provide more video updates.

Permaculture Gardening

16 Mar

Like This!

Our property at Cedar House Inn is not known for good soil for growing flowers and vegetables. I have planted over 250 trees and shrubs since we purchased the property and struggled with digging each hole. First we have a very thin layer of top soil, then hard clay and finally a rock layer. To have a viable garden we have no choice but to haul in or make our own dirt.

Rather than hauling in dump truck loads of top soil I decided to make dirt the way mother nature intended. Down by the yurts we have a forest of trees and layers of leaves under the trees that have accumulated for many years. Raking back some of the leaves you notice decomposition of the organic matter. Worms, insects and fungi are all doing their part in breaking down the leaves. Could I use a similar process to make good dirt in areas where only rock and clay exists? I read about Permaculture (sheet mulching) and Lasagna Gardening that explains just how I can do that.

Last Fall I identified where I wanted the vegetable garden to be. I then took large sheets of cardboard and placed them on the ground as a weed barrier. The cardboard decomposes over time like the layers of leaves in the woods. After watering the cardboard sheets I hauled many loads of leaves to place over the cardboard. Next I added wheat straw, then more leaves. This created a “lasagna like” layer. Some beds were covered with black plastic to help the composting process. When my wife had vegetable scraps I dug a hole in the bed and bury the scraps. I also buried rotted wood to add other microbes and insects to assist in the composting process.

One bed has a worm tower that I made. The tower is a 5 gallon plastic bucket with holes the size of a pencil that I drilled. We add vegetable scraps and red wiggler worms to eat the scraps and make worm castings and tea.

I have read that by Spring if the organic matter is not fully decomposed that is fine. I can dig a hole in the garden for the plant, add some top soil in the hole and plant. This type of gardening also requires no weeding which I like.

We are looking forward to growing vegetables using this simple permaculture gardening method. Be on the look out for more posts about how our garden grows once planting season arrives.

Herbal Gardening Classes

1 Mar


Come stay with us and attend one of the three-part series on Herbal Gardening by Dahlonega Healing Arts. Classes presented by Suzanne Albright, Gardening Coach, Designer and Horticulturist.

Class 1: Growing your own herbs – March 16th
*How to grow herbs in your garden or container
*Herbs the thrive in Georgia
*How to best prepare your planting beds
*Designing suggestions with herbs

Class 2: Medicinal and healing herbs – March 23rd
*Properties of specific herbs
*How to prepare herbs in a variety of forms to best treat any number of conditions.
*Herbs for teas
*Herbs for infusions
*Herbs for aromatherapy

Class 3: Culinary herbs – March 30th
*How to prepare herbs and incorporate into your favorite foods
*How and when to harvest your herbs
*How to dry and store herbs

DATES: Tuesday, March 16, 23, 30 – Classes available individually or as a series.
TIME: 6- 7:30pm
PRICE: Individual class: $12, Three-part series $30
LOCATION: Dahlonega Healing Arts
81 Crown Mountain Place, Building E, Suite 100
Dahlonega, GA 30533
CALL TO RESERVE: 706-867-7026

Permaculture Workshop 3/20 Dawsonville

11 Jan

Come stay with us Friday and/or Saturday evening and attend this informative workshop. Here at Cedar House Inn we are very interested in permaculture.

Introduction to Permaculture, a one day workshop, at Cedar Hill Enrichment Center in Gainesville, GA, with Bob Burns and Isabel Crabtree, founders of Central Georgia Permaculture Institute and GeorgiaPermaculture.com. Bob and Isabel are regionally noted Permaculture Designers, teachers and homesteaders near Milledgeville, GA.

Date is Saturday, March 20, 2010, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Cost is $60 which INCLUDES LUNCH.
They will cover how to “Think like a Permaculturist”- the basic ideas of Permaculture, including principles, ethics, designing landscapes, water catchment and concepts such as Food Forests, Home Ecosystems, and much more will be covered in first half of this workshop. After lunch do a “walk-about” with plant guru Bob Burns, and then work on an “Herb Spiral” which exemplifies Permaculture Principles at work. Lunch will be provided. Cedar Hill is located at 5735 Dawsonville Hwy, Gainesville, GA 30506.

For more information or to register, please call Kat at (770)887-0051 or email her at kat@discovercedarhill.org. Class is expected to fill up quickly, so please sign up early!

White House Organic Farm

19 Mar

What a great idea for Obama to set a great example for all Americans to eat locally and organically. Also to motivate others to have their own backyard garden.

There’s Gold In Them Thar Hills

21 Feb


The title of this entry is a favorite old time saying in the Dahlonega area regarding the prevalence of gold during the early 1800’s Gold Rush.

I am not referring to the precious metal gold but liquid gold. A substance that every human being produces in varying quantities. Also called Urine.

In Sweden they have found that urine is a valuable natural resource and is used as a natural fertilizer in farming. High in nitrogen it is especially good for leafy green vegetables. It is diluted with water in a 8:1 ratio.

They also found in Sweden that it is easier to process human waste more efficiently if the urine is not mixed with the feces. It is also better for the environment. They have even developed urine diverting toilets to separate the liquid gold from solids. It’s also interesting that privys or outhouses do not create odors when the solids are separated from the urine.

For more information read the book Liquid Gold which can be purchased on the eco store page of our web site.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 40 other followers

%d bloggers like this: